Considering a Dynasty Trust? What You Need to Know

A Closer Look at Dynasty Trusts

In 2017, a significant event brought dynasty trusts into the limelight when NBA team owner Gail Miller transferred ownership of her team, the Utah Jazz, and other assets into a dynasty trust. This move showcased a powerful estate planning tool often associated with preserving vast family wealth across generations.

Dynasty trust planning with family on the way What is a Dynasty Trust?

A dynasty trust, sometimes known as a legacy trust, is a type of irrevocable trust crafted to benefit multiple generations. The trust holds assets indefinitely under state laws that permit such arrangements. While the Rule Against Perpetuities—a law limiting a trust's lifespan—applies in some states, others have abolished this rule, allowing a dynasty trust potentially to last forever.

Benefits and Limitations

Dynasty trusts are prized for their ability to keep wealth within a family while avoiding substantial estate taxes and the generation-skipping transfer tax. By maintaining assets within the trust rather than distributing them directly to beneficiaries, these trusts can significantly enhance wealth longevity and growth across generations.

However, the strength of a dynasty trust—its permanence—also introduces complexities. Since it’s irrevocable, making changes to the trust once established is highly challenging. It necessitates foresight about future changes in family circumstances or asset values, requiring meticulous planning from the outset.

Is a Dynasty Trust Suitable for Your Family?

Dynasty trusts are most beneficial for families with significant assets that would otherwise face large estate taxes over generations. They protect against taxes, divorces, creditors, and potentially poor financial decisions by future generations. However, they also limit the flexibility of beneficiaries to control their inheritance directly.

If you're considering whether a dynasty trust fits your estate planning needs, understanding both the advantages and limitations is crucial. These trusts are not suitable for everyone, but under the right circumstances, they can be an invaluable tool for preserving family wealth.

Considering Your Options

To determine if a dynasty trust is the right choice for your family's estate planning needs, consulting with knowledgeable estate planning attorneys in Reno can provide clarity and direction. Contact us today to explore this and other strategies for securing your family's future.

Contact our Reno estate planning office to discuss how a dynasty trust might benefit your legacy planning.

The Best States for Dynasty Trusts: A Comparative Guide

Introduction to Dynasty Trusts

In the world of estate planning, Dynasty Trusts have become increasingly popular due to their ability to bypass estate taxes and shield assets from creditors across many generations. Not all states are created equal when it comes to the laws governing these trusts. Alaska, Delaware, Nevada, and South Dakota have emerged as leaders in attracting out-of-state Dynasty Trusts, thanks to their favorable laws.

What is a Dynasty Trust?

A Dynasty Trust is a robust irrevocable trust crafted to last through several generations. It's designed not only to preserve family wealth but also to offer protection from creditors, divorce settlements, and bankruptcy. These trusts often empower the primary beneficiary with significant control over the trust assets, mimicking outright ownership but without the associated risks.

A Dynasty Trust is a robust irrevocable trust crafted to last through several generations. It's designed not only to preserve family wealth but also to offer protection from creditors, divorce settlements, and bankruptcy. These trusts often empower the primary beneficiary with significant control over the trust assets, mimicking outright ownership but without the associated risks.

State-by-State Comparison

These four states have developed unique trust landscapes that cater specifically to the needs of Dynasty Trusts:

Alaska allows trusts to potentially last up to 1,000 years and offers strong protections against creditors, including protection from claims by divorcing spouses.
Delaware is known for its perpetual trusts for personal property, though real property trusts are capped at 110 years. It has unique decanting laws that allow for flexibility in trust management but requires careful drafting to avoid issues with divorcing spouse claims.
Nevada boasts a 365-year limit on trust duration and is noted for its lack of state income tax on trusts, robust spendthrift provisions, and flexible decanting rules that enhance creditor protection.
South Dakota allows for perpetual trusts and has advantageous decanting and creditor protection laws, making it a strong contender for setting up a Dynasty Trust.
Decanting Laws Across States

Decanting is a process that allows trustees to transfer assets from one trust to another—a useful feature that can adapt a trust to changing laws or family circumstances. Among the four states, Delaware, Nevada, and South Dakota offer more flexibility in decanting practices compared to Alaska, providing significant strategic advantages in long-term trust management.

Choosing the Right State for Your Trust

While Alaska, Delaware, Nevada, and South Dakota are top choices, other states like Tennessee, Ohio, and Wyoming also offer strong Dynasty Trust provisions. Selecting the right jurisdiction depends on specific trust goals, the location of trust assets, and the residence of beneficiaries. Working with knowledgeable estate attorneys in the chosen state can ensure that the trust is set up to maximize benefits.

Conclusion

For those considering a Dynasty Trust, these states offer compelling reasons to look beyond your home state. With their strong legal frameworks for long-term asset protection and tax benefits, they present golden opportunities for securing family wealth across generations.

 

When you pass away, your debts, including your mortgage, do not simply vanish. If your will or trust leaves your property, which still has a loan against it, to a beneficiary, they will inherit both the real estate and the remaining debt. The beneficiary might have the option to assume the mortgage, allowing them to retain ownership of the house, or they could opt to sell the property and use the proceeds to settle the debt. The specific outcomes depend on the terms of the mortgage and the directives laid out in the estate plan. Planning ahead for the transfer of your real estate assets can significantly simplify the process for your heirs, making it a smoother transition during a challenging time.

American Housing Debt: A Growing Concern

In recent years, American housing debt has soared to unprecedented levels. According to the US Census Bureau, the homeownership rate was approximately 66 percent in 2022. By the end of September 2023, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported that Americans were carrying $12.14 trillion in mortgage balances. This figure represents a significant portion of US consumer debt, emphasizing the crucial role of real estate in personal finance. The increase in mortgage debt highlights the importance of addressing how these obligations are managed after the homeowner's death.

The Prevalence of Unpaid Mortgages

With housing debt constituting a substantial part of consumer debt, it's not surprising that many Americans pass away while still owing on their mortgages. A survey by CreditCards.com revealed that 37 percent of Americans died with unpaid mortgages. This situation poses potential complications for heirs and underscores the need for comprehensive estate planning.

Inheritance Trends and Real Estate

The inclination to leave a home to one's children is strong among American parents, with a 2023 Charles Schwab survey indicating that more than three-quarters of parents intend to do so. However, the reality of inheriting a home is complex, especially given the current real estate market dynamics. Nearly 70 percent of potential heirs express a preference to sell the inherited property, often due to financial considerations or the rising costs of real estate.

probate

Managing Mortgages in Estate Planning

When it comes to estate planning, one of the critical concerns is how to handle mortgages on inherited properties. The process varies significantly depending on the decedent's estate plan, the terms of the mortgage, and state laws.

Scenario 1: Single Beneficiary Inheritance

When a property is left to a single beneficiary, whether through a will, trust, or deed, several outcomes are possible. The beneficiary might assume the existing mortgage, pay off the mortgage with other funds, or sell the property and use the proceeds to settle the debt. Some lenders may also allow for the refinancing of the loan under the new owner's name, potentially offering more favorable terms.

Scenario 2: Multiple Beneficiaries

In cases where multiple beneficiaries inherit a property, the situation becomes more complex. These beneficiaries must agree on how to manage the inherited mortgage, whether by assuming it jointly, selling the property, or using other funds to pay off the debt. Disagreements can lead to legal challenges, potentially resulting in a court-ordered sale of the property.

Scenario 3: Inheritance through Probate

For those who die without a will or trust, the probate process determines the distribution of their assets, including real estate. The executor of the estate is responsible for managing the deceased's debts and assets, which may involve using estate funds to maintain mortgage payments until the property can be sold or transferred.

The Importance of Planning

Estate planning goes beyond merely distributing assets; it's about ensuring that your legacy is passed on according to your wishes without imposing undue burdens on your loved ones. For homeowners, this means considering the implications of mortgage debt and making arrangements to ease the financial strain on heirs.

Crafting a Thoughtful Estate Plan

An effective estate plan addresses all aspects of your assets, including your home and any outstanding mortgage. It might include setting aside funds to cover mortgage payments, instructions for the sale of the property, or provisions for refinancing the mortgage to benefit your heirs.

Consulting with Professionals

Given the complexities of estate law and the intricacies of mortgages, seeking advice from an estate planning attorney is advisable. They can provide tailored guidance that aligns with your goals and ensures your estate is handled smoothly.

As American housing debt continues to climb, the importance of incorporating real estate into your estate planning cannot be overstated. Understanding how your mortgage debt will be managed after your passing is crucial to ensuring your heirs can navigate their inheritance without undue stress. Through careful planning and professional advice, you can secure your legacy and provide for your loved ones even after you're gone.

Estate planning is not merely a legal necessity, but a shield to safeguard yourself, your family, and your financial achievements, irrespective of their magnitude. Despite its crucial role, a disheartening number of individuals overlook the value of estate planning. Whether it's about formulating a new estate plan or refining an existing one, procrastination can be a risky game. Below is an insight into some unsettling statistics regarding estate planning among Americans, emphasizing the urgency to address this issue to prevent becoming a part of these grim figures.

A Majority Lack a Will or Trust
Shockingly, only a third of Americans have a will or trust in place. This fact can be attributed to widespread myths and apprehensions surrounding estate planning. A significant number of people without a will or trust feel that their assets are too modest to warrant an estate plan. The misconception that estate planning caters only to the affluent, alongside hurdles like hectic schedules, perceived complexity or cost, or the uncomfortable subject of mortality, often delays this critical task. However, the advantages of proactive planning substantially outweigh the drawbacks of postponement.

Estate Planning Conversations Are Often Avoided
Death is an uncomfortable topic for many, yet discussing it and the accompanying estate planning aspects with family can be incredibly beneficial. It's alarming that 52% of individuals are clueless about where their parents have stored their estate planning documents, and a mere 46% of executors are aware of their nomination in a will. It's pivotal to have open conversations with your family regarding the whereabouts of essential documents and inform those involved in your estate plan about their roles, ensuring clarity and preparedness for the future. Some estate planners facilitate family meetings post the drafting of an estate plan to elucidate the responsibilities entailed.

Family Disputes Are Not Uncommon
A survey by LegalShield revealed that 58% of American adults have either been embroiled in or know someone who has faced family conflicts stemming from inadequate estate planning. Such disputes, often revolving around the distribution of assets post a loved one’s demise, underscore the necessity of meticulous planning. Engaging a proficient estate planning attorney can be instrumental in crafting a plan that minimizes familial discord and the potential for permanent rifts.

Seize the Moment to Plan or Revise Your Estate
The importance of solid planning stands timeless. With American retirees poised to transfer an astounding $36 trillion to heirs, charitable causes, and other beneficiaries over the forthcoming three decades, the call for a thorough financial and estate plan has never been louder. Cast aside apprehensions and kick start or proceed with your planning journey to steer clear of morphing into an unfavorable estate planning statistic. For any inquiries or guidance on initiating or amending your estate plan, we are just a call away.

Much like a well-attended roll call, a robust estate plan needs several legal instruments to ensure its comprehensiveness. The term 'estate planning' might ring a bell, yet the specifics of the legal tools involved may not be as clear. Let's delve into the essential legal tools that constitute a thorough estate plan and explore the protections and advantages each one offers.

Foundation With a Will or Revocable Living Trust:
Establishing a sound foundation is paramount for any structure, and estate planning is no exception. A will or a revocable living trust (RLT) acts as this foundation, guiding the distribution of your assets. While a will operates posthumously, an RLT provides directives both during incapacity and after death, thus making the choice between the two a pivotal decision based on individual circumstances.

Will: A typical choice for a foundational tool, a will necessitates a probate process to distribute your assets, although some assets can bypass probate through beneficiary designations or joint ownership. It's crucial to choose a competent executor to ensure smooth execution of your wishes.

Trust: An RLT, on the other hand, allows for probate avoidance, provided the assets are retitled to the trust. Besides, an RLT offers protection should you become incapacitated, making it a more encompassing tool.

Despite having an RLT, a 'pour-over' will is essential to transfer any assets not titled in the trust at the time of death, also enabling you to nominate guardians for minor children and specify funeral arrangements.

A testamentary trust is another notable tool, created posthumously through provisions stated in a will during one's lifetime, offering a customized distribution plan.

Financial Power of Attorney (POA):
A financial POA is a customizable legal tool, allowing you to appoint an agent to manage your financial affairs. The scope of authority granted can range from specific tasks under a limited POA to almost all financial decisions under a general POA. A Durable POA remains effective even during incapacity, ensuring continued financial management.

Medical Power of Attorney:
Entrusting someone to make medical decisions on your behalf during incapacity is facilitated through a medical POA. This document allows you to appoint a trusted individual, ensuring that your medical preferences are honored even when you cannot communicate them.

Advance Healthcare Directive:
Commonly known as a living will, an advance directive lets you specify your preferences for end-of-life care. It's a critical tool to have, providing clear instructions about life-support measures in terminal or vegetative conditions.

HIPAA Authorizations:
The Health Insurance and Accountability Act (HIPAA) authorizations enable designated individuals to access your medical records. While not granting decision-making authority, these authorizations ensure selected individuals are informed about your medical condition.

Guardianship Provisions:
For parents, securing the future of minor children is paramount. Some states offer separate legal instruments for appointing guardians, whereas others incorporate these provisions within a will. Consultation with an estate planning attorney can provide clarity on the appropriate tools for your state.

Temporary Guardianship or Parental Power Delegation:
Circumstances like extended travel may necessitate the delegation of parental powers to a temporary guardian. Understanding state-specific guidelines regarding the duration and limitations of such delegations is crucial to ensure the well-being of your children during your absence.

Navigating through the legal intricacies of estate planning might seem daunting, but with the right guidance and a well-structured plan, you can secure peace of mind for yourself and your loved ones. Engaging with an experienced estate planning attorney will ensure that the legal tools in your estate planning toolkit are tailored to meet your unique needs and circumstances.

When it comes to estate planning and legacy planning, most individuals focus on passing down their assets to their children and heirs. However, for those seeking to establish a legacy that will endure for generations, the concept of a dynasty trust becomes particularly intriguing.

A dynasty trust, an integral part of estate planning, is an irrevocable trust that offers similar tax advantages and asset protection as other trust types, but with a remarkable distinction—it can span multiple generations. Often referred to as perpetual trusts, dynasty trusts are meticulously designed to last indefinitely, as long as the trust's assets remain intact. Given the long-term nature of a dynasty trust, it is imperative to establish it with utmost care and attention to detail. Once the trust is in place, its rules generally cannot be altered, underscoring the importance of getting everything right from the beginning.

 

 

Understanding the Mechanism of a Dynasty Trust

Setting up a dynasty trust follows a process akin to that of any other trust. The grantor, who serves as the trust's creator, transfers funds and assets into the trust during their lifetime or, in the case of a testamentary dynasty trust, after their death. Once the trust is funded, it becomes irrevocable, and the rules established by the grantor become fixed. Modifying these rules is only possible under specific state laws that govern trust modifications.

 

Selecting the Ideal Trustee for Your Dynasty Trust

When establishing a dynasty trust, thoughtful consideration must be given to selecting the most suitable trustee. It is common practice to appoint an independent trustee, such as a bank or trust company, to administer the trust throughout its existence. Although a beneficiary can serve as a trustee, this approach may give rise to potential issues concerning taxes and creditor protection. A beneficiary-controlled trust can have significant implications for income and estate taxes, depending on the extent of the beneficiary's powers. It can also impact the level of asset protection provided to the beneficiary and expose family wealth to the risk of misappropriation. On the other hand, a corporate trustee, such as the dynasty trust itself, possesses indefinite legal life and can ensure uninterrupted administration across generations. Corporate trustees typically charge an annual fee based on the value of assets held in the trust.

 

Determining Who Should Utilize a Dynasty Trust

While trusts are generally beneficial for individuals across various financial backgrounds, there are exceptions, and the dynasty trust is one of them. Establishing a dynasty trust does not necessitate grand dynastic aspirations akin to illustrious families like the Medici or the House of Windsor. However, it is most commonly utilized by families with substantial wealth. While there are no legal requirements regarding the minimum amount of funds needed to establish a dynasty trust, from a practical perspective, it is typically suitable for those with sufficient wealth and assets capable of sustaining multiple generations, taking into account the financial needs and responsibilities of the beneficiaries. Grantors who are concerned about future generations beyond their children often opt for dynasty trusts as part of their estate and legacy planning. Additionally, dynasty trusts can prove invaluable for families that own a family business and desire to maintain its continuity within the family lineage.

Statistics reveal that many family businesses fail to survive beyond the second or third generation, but a dynasty trust can significantly enhance the chances of success. By placing shares of the business into the trust, the grantor can provide for multiple generations of beneficiaries while ensuring the seamless continuation of business operations through professional trustee management. The trustee assumes responsibility for managing the business affairs and maintaining continuity, while the beneficiaries reap financial benefits. Furthermore, the grantor can include specific terms within the trust to guarantee competent business management, such as mandating the trustee to establish an advisory council functioning as a board of directors.

 

Tax Benefits of a Dynasty Trust: Preserving Your Wealth for Future Generations

In the realm of estate planning and legacy planning, one of the notable advantages of establishing a dynasty trust is the potential for significant tax benefits. By leveraging the federal estate tax exemption amount (which currently stands at $12.06 million per individual in 2022, or twice that amount for couples) to fund a dynasty trust, you can effectively transfer money and property directly to your grandchildren while avoiding gift or generation-skipping transfer (GST) taxes. To achieve this, you would place accounts and property into the trust and file a gift tax return to allocate appropriate tax exemptions to the trust or pay a portion of the wealth transfer tax. This strategic approach ensures that these assets are not included in your taxable estate, nor in the taxable estates of your beneficiaries, provided that the trust is fully exempt from GST tax.

Furthermore, utilizing trust funds to cover a beneficiary's living expenses or investing in a home for their benefit can also help reduce their taxable estate. Additionally, when a dynasty trust is properly drafted, accounts and property left to your loved ones within the trust can enjoy protection from creditors and divorce courts. In contrast, gifting money outright may not offer these same protective benefits.

It is worth noting that dynasty trusts are not available in every state due to the rule against perpetuities, a common law principle that restricts the duration of controlled property interests, including those established within trusts. This rule, which was not specifically created for trusts, aims to prevent individuals from exerting control over property ownership for an extended period after their demise through legal instruments like deeds and trusts. However, many states have modified or even eliminated this rule, as its interpretation can be complex. With the guidance of an experienced estate planning attorney, you may be able to establish a trust in a state where you do not reside, taking advantage of more favorable laws.

 

Crafting Your Dynasty: Navigating the Process

If you are considering the establishment of a dynasty trust, our firm can connect you with a skilled estate planning attorney who can guide you through the process. During your consultation, crucial factors such as selecting a trustee and beneficiaries, implementing tax and creditor protection strategies, understanding state laws pertaining to perpetual trusts, and aligning the dynasty trust with your comprehensive estate plan will be thoroughly discussed. Taking this initial step will enable you to secure your legacy and ensure the preservation of your wealth for future generations. To embark on this journey, please reach out to us, and we will be delighted to assist you.

 

May marks not only the end of the academic year and the start of summer, but it also marks the beginning of the busiest season for moving - National Moving Month! When you're moving, there are numerous tasks to tackle, including packing your belongings, managing utilities, forwarding mail, updating voter registration, and more. As you prepare for your next move, there are two major tasks to take into consideration:

 

Locating Your Important Documents

In all of the chaos of moving boxes and packing tape, it is easy for things to get lost in the shuffle or even thrown out during a move. Certain important documents, such as birth certificates, social security cards, passports, financial statements and estate planning documents, should not be packed up and put on the moving truck along with your less important belongings. Keep these important documents safe and accessible during your move and ensure that they do not get thrown out by accident.

One idea is to purchase a portable file box with an attached lid and a secure latch. You might consider purchasing a brightly colored one so that it is easily identifiable. Then, place this file box in a secure and easily accessible location. If you are moving locally, a logical place might be at a family member’s or friend’s home. If you are moving a longer distance, that place might be the trunk of your car.

Having electronic backup copies of your important documents is a wise decision, especially during a move. You can take pictures of your documents and save them on your smartphone or a password-protected removable flash or external hard drive. Another option would be to store it in the cloud. This way, you'll always have a copy of these important documents in case you cannot locate the original.

Adding this step to your moving checklist can save you time and from stress. For example, you will not have to run around searching through unpacked boxes for your children's birth certificates to register them for their new school.

 

Meeting with Your Advisor Team

When moving, it's important to not only contact the moving company, but also to reach out to your team of advisors. A major consideration is the cost associated with the move, which is influenced by factors like the size of your home, the distance of the move, and your preference for do-it-yourself tasks. To ensure your moving expenses align with your long-term financial objectives, it's advisable to consult your financial advisor and establish a moving budget.

It is recommended to contact your estate planning attorney if you are moving different states. While a will or trust created in one state should generally be valid in another, certain documents such as a financial or medical power of attorney may be state-specific. Due to the variations in estate planning laws across different states, it is strongly advised that you have your estate planning documents examined to ensure their effectiveness in your new state. You can have your attorney review the documents or they can assist you in finding a local attorney who can review them for you in your new state.

If you and your spouse are moving out of or into a community property state, your estate planning may be more complicated. In these states, any property acquired during the marriage is presumed to be owned equally by both spouses, while property brought into the marriage by one spouse or acquired by gift or inheritance is separate property. Moving from a community property state to a common law state or vice versa raises questions about the status of community property. For instance, if a couple purchases a home in California during their marriage and then moves to Nebraska and buys a new home with the proceeds from selling their California home, is the new Nebraska home community property? Your estate planning attorney can answer these questions and help you take necessary steps to maintain any tax benefits.

Moving involves many things to consider, but don't forget to keep your important documents secure and meet with your team of advisers. These are crucial items to add to your moving checklist. If you're planning to move soon, we would be more than happy to help you keep this as smooth as possible.

 

Every child is a precious gift, and as parents or grandparents, we strive to plan for their future, anticipating their needs and aspirations. However, families with special needs children or grandchildren face additional responsibilities in ensuring their loved one's future is secure, fulfilling, and supported. To ensure a flourishing future for your special needs child or grandchild, estate planning measures focused on their unique circumstances are essential. We recommend the following steps:

 

Have a Special/Supplemental Needs Trust Prepared

When it comes to estate planning, creating a Special or Supplemental Needs Trust (SNT) for your special needs child or grandchild should be a top priority. An SNT is a specialized trust designed to set aside funds and assets for the benefit of a beneficiary who may qualify for public assistance due to their disabilities. It can be established as a standalone trust or added to your existing trust.

It's important to note that government programs providing aid to disabled individuals have strict criteria regarding the amount of money and property a person can own while receiving benefits. Structuring any inheritance your special needs beneficiary may receive in a way that doesn't disqualify them from obtaining government benefits is crucial. Even if they are not currently receiving government benefits, considering the possibility of future needs is essential. To ensure all opportunities are available, it is vital that the trust is meticulously drafted by a lawyer well-versed in the eligibility requirements for government benefits.

An SNT not only provides financial security but also allows you to appoint a care manager or advisory committee. The care manager serves as an advocate for your special needs beneficiary, overseeing their well-being periodically or daily, depending on their level of care requirements. An advisory committee, comprising family members, friends, and professionals, can provide guidance to the trustee on the beneficiary's needs and the best use of the funds.

Additionally, the SNT can include a statement of intent, outlining the trust's purpose and how the funds should be utilized. This section acts as a safety net in case changes in the law make the beneficiary ineligible for government benefits. It allows for modifications to ensure your original intentions are met, even in the face of unforeseen circumstances.

 

Write Down Your Instructions

In addition to establishing an SNT, putting your instructions in writing is crucial to ensure your wishes are carried out as intended. Consider creating a letter or memorandum of intent that provides guidance to your trustee on managing the trust after your passing. Although not legally binding, this document offers valuable insights into your true intentions. You can include details on how the funds should be used in accordance with government rules, specific goals you would like the beneficiary to achieve, and the standard of living you envision for them.

 

Explore Life Insurance as a Funding Option

Supporting a special needs child or grandchild can be financially demanding, and it's important to consider how to sustain their care once you pass away. Life insurance can be a valuable tool in ensuring there will be sufficient funds for the trustee to use for their benefit. By designating the SNT as the beneficiary, you can provide a lump sum payment that is not subject to the same tax liabilities as retirement accounts.

 

Assess Your Retirement Account Distribution Options

The SECURE Act has brought changes to how beneficiaries can receive distributions from inherited IRAs, potentially impacting the financial support available to your special needs beneficiary. However, the Act also recognizes "eligible designated beneficiaries," including individuals with disabilities, who can still receive distributions over their life expectancies. Congress has established rules that allow the life expectancy of disabled beneficiaries to be used for certain types of trusts. If you have a substantial retirement account, it is crucial to discuss your distribution options to maximize benefits for all your beneficiaries.

 

Contact Us for Assistance!

We understand that securing a bright future for your special needs child or grandchild is of utmost importance to you. Our priority is to work with you in developing a comprehensive plan that will guarantee continued care and well-being for your loved ones. Please do not hesitate to reach out to us to schedule an appointment so that we can begin this process together.

When Elvis Presley, the King of Rock and Roll, passed away in 1977, he left behind a complicated legacy, just like his famous dance moves. His estate, including the iconic Graceland, eventually ended up in the hands of his only child, Lisa Marie Presley. However, the future of Elvis's legacy and the fate of his estate face challenges ahead. These challenges involve Lisa Marie's personal financial issues, a significant age gap among her children, and even a legal dispute initiated by her mother, Priscilla Presley. The unfolding of this captivating saga will determine the course of Elvis's rockin' legacy.

From Elvis to Lisa Marie: Inheritance and Financial Legacy
Lisa Marie, born in 1968 to the legendary rock and roll icon Elvis Presley and his wife Priscilla Presley, had to face the tragic loss of her father at a young age. Sadly, Elvis passed away at forty-two due to a heart attack. Fast forward to January 2023, and Lisa Marie herself succumbed to heart problems at the age of fifty-four.

Despite Elvis's untimely departure, his legacy has continued to thrive, with his estate earning an impressive $400 million in the previous year alone. The value of the estate skyrocketed to over $1 billion, thanks in part to the 2022 Elvis biopic movie. This created a substantial financial legacy for Lisa Marie to inherit.

The Elvis Presley Trust
When Elvis Presley passed away, his estate was placed in a trust with Lisa Marie, his grandmother, and his father as beneficiaries. According to the trust, Lisa Marie's inheritance was held in trust until she turned twenty-five in February 1993. After that, the trust dissolved automatically, and Lisa Marie inherited $100 million, including Graceland, her childhood home.

Today, Graceland stands as a museum and popular tourist attraction, generating over $10 million annually. To manage Graceland and the rest of Elvis's estate, which includes Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. (EPE), Lisa Marie established the Elvis Presley Trust. Until 2005, Lisa Marie served as the owner and chairperson of EPE's board, but she later sold 85 percent of its assets.

Graceland and the Living Trust
Graceland, the iconic mansion that was once Elvis Presley's residence, has become a symbol of his legacy and a beloved tourist destination. After Lisa Marie inherited it, she made it clear that Graceland would always remain within the family.

Lisa Marie's children, Riley Keough, Harper Lockwood, and Finley Lockwood, are set to inherit her fortune and properties through a living trust. However, Lisa Marie's son, Benjamin Keough, tragically passed away in 2020.

Considering that it's unclear whether Lisa Marie had a separate will in place, the living trust, an estate planning document, will play a significant role in determining the distribution of her assets. Through the living trust, individuals can transfer ownership of accounts and property to a separate entity, the trust, which they control while alive. The trust also names a successor trustee to manage the accounts and property after their passing.

Priscilla Presley's Trust Challenge
A challenge to Lisa Marie's living trust has emerged from an unexpected source—her own mother, Priscilla Presley. The legal dispute revolves around a 2016 amendment to the trust, which removed Priscilla and a former business manager as trustees and replaced them with Lisa Marie's daughter, Riley Keough, and her late son, Benjamin Keough.

Navigating the Challenges: Estate Planning and Protecting Your Legacy
Priscilla's claim challenges the validity of the living trust amendment, citing violations of legal requirements. She highlights the lack of proper notification, absence of witnesses or notarization, and even a misspelling of her name in the document. Adding to her concerns, Priscilla alleges that her daughter's signature appears suspiciously different from her usual signature. Consequently, she has sought the court's intervention to invalidate the amendment that removed her as the trustee.

Lisa Marie's Financial Struggles
Recent legal documents indicate that Lisa Marie faced financial challenges before her passing, despite inheriting $100 million at the age of twenty-five. She held approximately $95,000 in cash and possessed various assets such as bonds and stocks valued at $715,000. Although she earned over $100,000 per month from EPE, she also carried a $1 million tax debt and incurred monthly expenses of $92,000. Furthermore, her ex-husband, Michael Lockwood, reopened a lawsuit seeking $4,600 per month in child support.

By 2016, Lisa Marie's $100 million trust had significantly dwindled to just $14,000 in cash. Her former manager, Barry Siegel, faced allegations of mismanaging her finances, which resulted in a decline of her wealth. Court records reveal that Lisa Marie was burdened with a $16.67 million debt at that time. However, in 2019, Siegel countered the claims and asserted that the sale of her 85 percent stake in EPE helped resolve over $20 million in debts.

Potential Legal Challenges for the Lisa Marie Presley Estate
The legal ambiguity surrounding Lisa Marie's estate gives rise to numerous potential legal issues that will likely require judicial resolution. One such challenge is Priscilla's claim against the living trust amendment. If her challenge is successful, the amendment would be considered void, making Priscilla the successor trustee responsible for managing the trust's assets and funds instead of Lisa Marie's daughter, Riley. This matter would necessitate court intervention for resolution.

Creditor Claims
Although it remains uncertain whether Lisa Marie had outstanding debts, if she did, creditors could make claims against her estate. The estate would need to determine whether to accept or reject these claims. Rejecting them could lead to legal disputes. Creditors hold priority over beneficiaries, which means that Lisa Marie's accounts and property, including Graceland, might need to be sold to satisfy any outstanding debts. Additionally, even after the debts are settled, the estate may still be subject to estate taxes, which could further complicate matters if creditors decide to initiate lawsuits.

Her Daughters' Inheritance
Assuming the estate possesses sufficient funds to settle debts without selling Graceland, Lisa Marie's three daughters, Riley, Harper, and Finley, are poised to inherit the mansion and any remaining property or funds. However, the upkeep and tax costs associated with Graceland surpass $500,000 annually. It remains uncertain whether the daughters would collectively agree to bear these expenses and preserve the Elvis legacy within the family.

The daughters have the option to sell Graceland, but this decision could ignite internal conflicts if even one daughter wishes to pursue a sale. Additionally, crucial details regarding the ages of the daughters and their inheritances remain unknown. Did Lisa Marie establish a trust to hold her twin daughters' inheritances until they reach a specific age, as her father did for her? Or does the trustee possess discretionary power over the funds? Moreover, depending on the outcome of the trust challenge, will the trustee ultimately be Riley or Priscilla?

Furthermore, the question of whether Lisa Marie distributed her estate equally among her daughters remains unclear, as there is no legal requirement for equal distribution.

Control What You Can with an Estate Plan
The sudden and tragic passing of Lisa Marie Presley serves as a reminder that death can come unexpectedly. However, through estate planning, we can exert some control over our legacy.
Crafting a comprehensive estate plan can help alleviate some of the uncertainty and provide peace of mind to both ourselves and our loved ones. If you're ready to start planning for the future, please reach out to our office to schedule a consultation.

For over a quarter of a century, the National Safety Council has designated June as a
month of paramount importance - a time to honor and prioritize safety at a national
level. This annual celebration, known as National Safety Month, serves as a powerful
reminder of the critical role that safety plays in our lives.

The aim of this month-long campaign is to increase public awareness about the most
significant safety and health risks faced by people in the United States. While many
people are aware of common safety hazards, such as physical injuries, they may not
realize that incapacity or death can result in substantial financial and emotional
consequences for themselves and their families. A revocable living trust is a legal tool
that can help protect you and your loved ones from the costs, uncertainty, and chaos
that may arise in the event of your incapacity or death.

Protection by a Revocable Living Trust for Yourself
Just like anyone else, you face the risk of experiencing a catastrophic accident or illness
that could leave you incapable of taking care of yourself or your loved ones. This
incapacity might be temporary, or it could last until your eventual death. The total cost of
incapacity can be difficult to calculate and can include lost wages, as well as the
expenses of required medical care. These expenses may include requiring assistance
with daily activities such as bathing, eating or dressing. However, it can quickly become
very costly - the average cost of assisted living in the United States in 2020 was
approximately $4,300 per month.

A revocable living trust is an essential legal tool that helps protect you and your loved
ones by providing instructions for how you will be financially supported during your
incapacity. With a revocable living trust, you can choose who will manage your finances
when you are no longer able to handle them yourself. There’s no better time than now
to establish a revocable living trust because it is revocable, which means that you can
change it at any time and alter it as your life circumstances change, as long as you have
the mental capacity.

Protection by a Revocable Living Trust for Your Loved Ones
Your loved ones’ financial and emotional well-being is also protected by a revocable
living trust. It ensures that your wishes are clearly outlined for what should happen in
the event of your incapacity or death. This prevents your loved ones from having to speculate
on your desires or worse, having to follow state law to determine who should handle your finances and end-of-life affairs.

Probate fees, which vary significantly by state, can also be very expensive. For
example, in California, attorney and executor fees for probating an $800,000 home
could be as high as $38,000, as set by law. A revocable living trust can help avoid
probate and those high accompanying fees.

Revocable living trusts also offer privacy protection. Without the instructions provided in
these trusts, family members often have to resort to public court proceedings. This
means that the court and other curious individuals may pry into your private affairs.

Furthermore, these types of trusts can provide basic martial deduction planning to
maximize the use of you and your spouse’s estate tax exemptions. This helps to reduce
your loved ones’ estate tax burden, after your death. Finally, by using this legal tool, you
can protect the money you leave to your loved ones from their creditors.

Properly Funding Your Revocable Living Trust
To ensure that a revocable living trust serves its intended purpose, it must be properly
funded. This means that any property you own must be transferred to the trust, or for
certain assets, the trust must be named as the beneficiary. Failure to properly fund your
trust may result in the need for probate. To avoid this, it is essential to review any
correspondence you have received from your attorney regarding which accounts and
properties should be owned by the trust or designated as beneficiaries. It is especially a
good time to do this in the month of June, which is National Safety Month!

Given the importance of the instructions contained in a revocable living trust, it is
advisable to review them annually to ensure that they still align with your final wishes. If
changes are necessary, it is recommended that you seek assistance from a
professional to update your trust accordingly. This will ensure that your trust continues
to serve you and your loved ones during times of incapacity and after your passing.

Please do not Hesitate to Contact Anderson, Dorn, & Rader for Help with Updating your Trust!

For managing your assets and providing for your loved ones after your passing, a trust is a potent tool. Yet, the trustee you choose will have a big influence on how your trust turns out. The trustee is responsible for overseeing and allocating assets in accordance with the conditions of the trust and must possess the skills, moral fortitude, and knowledge required to successfully discharge their obligations and adhere to your objectives.

 

 

Consider the trustee's relationship to you and your beneficiaries

The first factor to consider when choosing a trustee is their relationship to you and your beneficiaries. This can help guarantee that the trustee is driven to act in everyone's best interests and that they have a profound understanding of the importance of their position.

 

Evaluate the trustee's financial and legal expertise

Another important factor to consider is the trustee's financial and legal expertise. A good trustee should have a strong understanding of financial and legal matters, including tax law, investments, and estate planning. This can ensure that the trust is administered and distributed to maximize its worth and reduce its tax liabilities.

 

Assess the trustee's availability and willingness to serve

The trustee should also have the time and availability to manage the trust effectively. This entails being willing to embrace the responsibility of acting as a trustee and being flexible enough to devote the necessary amount of time and focus to the assignment. Make sure to discuss this issue with potential trustees upfront to avoid any misunderstandings or conflicts down the road.

 

Look for personal characteristics such as honesty, reliability, and responsibility

Finally, it's important to choose a trustee who possesses personal characteristics that make them trustworthy and reliable. Honesty, reliability, and responsibility are all essential traits for a good trustee. The trustee should be someone you trust implicitly, and who has a reputation for acting with integrity and following through on their commitments.

An individual trustee may have a more personal connection to you and your beneficiaries, and may be better suited to managing smaller trusts or those with less complex asset structures. However, a corporate trustee may offer more expertise and resources, as well as greater objectivity and accountability. The trustee has a right to compensation for their services, and it's crucial to make sure that it's just and reasonable.

Another important consideration is the need for ongoing professional guidance and support. Even the most experienced and capable trustee may need guidance from time to time, particularly when it comes to complex legal or financial matters. This will guarantee that what you want done, gets done.

Another important consideration is making sure your trustee has the knowledge necessary to manage your trust effectively on a legal and financial level. Selecting a trustee with expertise in areas like tax planning, investment management, or estate administration may be suitable depending on the complexity of your estate plan and the assets involved.

It's critical to remember that your selection of trustee is not final. If circumstances change or if you believe your present trustee is not performing up to your standards, you can always change them.

Choosing the right trustee is essential for ensuring the success of your trust. You can make an informed choice that will help ensure that your trust is managed and distributed in a way that reflects your wishes and values by taking into account aspects, like the trustee's relationship to you and your beneficiaries, their financial and legal expertise, their availability and willingness to serve, & their personal characteristics.

Prepare to be amazed! May is not just any ordinary month - it's National Home Remodeling Month, the time of year when the National Association of Home Builders officially recognizes the tremendous value of home improvement projects. Springtime comes with spring cleanings and home improvement projects, but can also be a good time to consider updating your estate planning documents.

If you need to make small updates to your estate planning documents, such as changing the names of beneficiaries or decision makers, you may wonder whether you can take care of these changes on your own or if you should seek the assistance of a professional. Here are some things to consider before choosing which option is best for you:

If Your Name Changes
If you've changed your name due to marriage and/or your own personal preference, and your estate planning documents don't need to be changed, you may only need to keep copies of any legal paperwork reflecting the name change. Keep copies of these documents together with your estate planning documents. If you've remarried and want to change your name in your estate planning information, or if a trust you established has your old name in the title, it's best to consult an industry professional, such as an attorney, to ensure that the name change is properly handled.

If a Beneficiary’s Name Changes
Wondering what you should do if your beneficiary's name changes? Whether it is due to marriage and/or personal preference, staying on top of this information can save you from running into issues later down the road. While updating your estate planning documents is not necessarily critical, it may be necessary for your beneficiary to prove their identity with a court order, marriage certificate, or birth certificate. It is important to avoid making changes directly on your estate planning documents, such as crossing out a name and writing in a new one. This has resulted in confusion and has even prompted litigation in the past. Courts have had to weigh in on these types of edits to estate planning documents to determine their validity and intent. Even though it may seem harmless, unforeseen consequences can often arise when attempting to edit legal documents yourself.

Adding or Removing a Beneficiary
When events occur such as the birth of a child or the passing of a beneficiary, you may wonder if you need to update your estate planning documents. The answer is that it depends on the language in your documents. Some estate planning documents are drafted to anticipate future additions or removals of beneficiaries by name. It is highly important to seek legal advice before making any changes to your estate planning documents, as serious legal consequences can result from attempting to do so on your own.

Making changes without legal advice could result in unintentionally cutting off people from receiving an inheritance or having your property go to those who never intended to benefit. For instance, adding a spouse’s name to the list of children in your estate planning documents could lead to unintended consequences if the spouse remarries after the child’s death. The former in-law could become a beneficiary of the family trust and have certain rights regarding the trust’s administration, including the right to demand a copy of the trust documents and any financial accountancy. Once that share is paid out, the former in-law might use it in a way that it was not originally intended for, causing negative consequences from an innocent and well-meaning attempt to provide for an in-law.

Appointing New Trusted Decision Makers
In some cases, you may want to appoint new individuals to make important decisions about your property if you become incapacitated or pass away. However, it’s important to understand that certain legal documents cannot be amended easily. While it may be tempting to simply cross off the names of the people you want to remove and add new preferred decision-makers, this can actually void the document under certain circumstances.

If you need to make such important changes, it’s best to have the documents redrafted and executed with the same formalities used in the original documents, ensuring that you follow the applicable state law. For instance, your state may require multiple unrelated witnesses to the signing of a modified will, even if the change you’re making is a one-sentence amendment. The same is true for a codicil, which is an amendment to your will. Other legal documents, such as a power of attorney, a trust amendment, or restatement, may also require similar formalities, such as having your signature notarized.

Modifying Distribution Provisions
There may be times when you consider altering the distribution provisions of your will or trust by changing the percentage/fraction shares of your estate. It is important to note that this modification should be avoided when attempting to make such changes on your own. It is always advisable to consult an attorney if you wish to modify the distribution provisions of your will or trust. You must consider this amendment very carefully and execute it with strict documentation. Such a change to your estate planning documents carries the risk that a beneficiary who receives less under the amendment may challenge it and use any argument available to invalidate the changes. An experienced estate planning attorney will know the necessary steps to take to ensure that your legal documents will be honored by your beneficiaries and the courts after you pass away.

As you have seen, remodeling your estate plan without the help of a trained and experienced attorney can lead to many potential issues. When handled properly, these changes don’t have to be expensive. Your attorney can quickly and inexpensively fix some of these small issues by drafting an amendment to your estate planning documents. Other changes may require more work because the issues are considerably more complex than you first realized. In either case, with a legal professional guiding you through the process, you can be confident that you will not be leaving your loved ones with a legal mess to sort out after you are gone.

If you are uncertain about whether you need an attorney to help you modify your estate plan, we encourage you to contact us. We are happy to consult with you and help you determine what changes, if any, you may need to make.

Ladies, You Need a Plan

Back in 1987, Congress recognized March as Women's History Month to celebrate the incredible contributions of women in American history across various fields. From building a strong and prosperous nation to being the backbone of their families, women have been unstoppable. Yet, in the midst of caring for others, women often neglect their own financial and estate planning. It's high time for women to prioritize themselves by crafting a solid plan that caters to their future needs, which may differ from those of their male counterparts and dependents.

Financial planning by ADR, Women's history month by ADR

Planning Considerations for Women

Longer life expectancies. According to Social Security Administration data, in 2021, women had an average life expectancy of 79.5 years compared to 74.2 years for men. As a result, it is important for women to create an estate plan that accounts for additional years of living expenses during retirement, healthcare costs, and possibly long-term care costs. As women age, there may be a greater possibility that they could become incapacitated and need someone to act on their behalf to make financial and healthcare decisions. Documents such as financial and healthcare powers of attorney and living wills authorize a person they trust to make decisions or take action for them if they are not able to act for themselves. Some women may not only own their own assets but also inherit wealth from both their parents and a spouse who dies before them, and if so, they need a financial and estate plan to optimally preserve and transfer this wealth. Because women may outlive their spouses, they also may be responsible for administering their spouse’s estate or become the sole surviving trustee of a joint trust. These duties may be difficult for a woman who is experiencing health issues that often occur at an advanced age, and this possibility should be addressed in their estate planning. For example, a woman concerned that she will be unable to handle administering her trust at an advanced age can name a co-trustee or successor trustee to administer it if she is no longer able to do so.

Lower earnings. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, women continue to earn less than men, and the pay gap widens as they age. In addition, because some women have shorter employment histories due to time off to raise children or care for aging parents, they may have less saved for retirement. As a result, it is important for them to take steps to protect their money and property from lawsuits or creditors’ claims. For example, a woman could transfer her money and property to an irrevocable trust. Because she is no longer the legal owner of the property, a creditor cannot reach it to satisfy claims against her so long as the trust is properly drafted to include appropriate distribution standards and administrative and other provisions. The woman may be a discretionary beneficiary of the trust, and the trustee may distribute the funds she needs for living expenses. Additionally, because they have less money and property during their retirement, women need to have a solid plan in place to make sure that they are able to financially provide for their loved ones upon their death and that unnecessary costs and expenses are minimized to the extent possible.

Care for loved ones. Many women are caregivers for minor children, adult children with special needs, or aging parents. As a result, they are often concerned about who will care for their loved ones if they are no longer able to do so. If a spouse or sibling is not available to provide care, they need to make sure that another family member or trusted individual can be the caregiver (sometimes called a guardian of the person) for their loved one. The same individual—or someone else—can serve as the guardian of the loved one’s estate (sometimes called a conservator or guardian of the estate) to manage the inheritance for their benefit. In the case of a child with special needs, if no family member is able to take on the responsibility of their care, a group home or assisted living facility may be the best choice. A special needs trust may need to be established to ensure that funds are available for the child’s care but do not decrease the amount of government benefits they are eligible to receive.

Anderson, Dorn & Rader Can Help You Plan Ahead!

You have accomplished a lot in your life! Celebrate your accomplishments and contributions during Women’s History Month by contacting us to set up an appointment to create an estate plan that provides for your own future needs and those of the people you love. You deserve the peace of mind that comes with knowing your future is secure.

As the new year begins, many of us take stock of our past and plan for the future. As a business owner, it can be easy to get caught up in daily tasks and neglect long-term planning for your its succession. However, it's essential to consider the impact and legacy you want your business to have in the future. If you want to make a positive difference for future generations, consider using a new, lesser-known planning tool called the purpose trust.

An Overview of Purpose Trusts

A traditional trust is a legal agreement between three parties: the grantor, trustee, and beneficiary. The grantor funds the trust with financial or property assets, and the trustee manages these assets according to the terms of the trust, for the benefit of designated beneficiaries. A charitable trust is an exception, as it is created for a charitable purpose but does not have specifically designated beneficiaries. Recently, some states have introduced the concept of noncharitable purpose trusts, also known as purpose trusts.

These trusts can be established for most lawful purposes, as long as they are reasonable and do not violate public policy. However, in some states, they can only be used for specific purposes such as pet care or grave site maintenance. To ensure that the trustee carries out the grantor's stated purpose, the grantor must appoint an independent “enforcer” who can petition the court if duties outlined in the trust are not performed. A trust protector can also be appointed to modify the trust if necessary, for example, to add beneficiaries or modify the jurisdiction where the trust is effective. The goal of a purpose trust is not primarily to minimize taxes or transfer wealth efficiently (though this can be achieved), but to ensure that the grantor's purpose is fulfilled.

Happy senior couple walking together in a forest.

Patagonia’s Purpose Trust

You’ve likely heard of, or own clothing from the company, Patagonia. In September 2022, Yvon Chouinard, the the company’s founder, transferred the voting stock of the $3 billion outfitter to a purpose trust to extend his mission of fighting the planet’s environmental crisis. In an excerpt on the Patagonia website, he stated that the company's continued purpose is to "save our home planet." After finding out his children did not have a desire to take over the family business, Chouinard decided not to sell the company, as he worried a new owner might have different values and his employees would not retain job security.

The Patagonia Purpose Trust, guided by the family and advisors, took over the voting stock of the company to ensure that its values were upheld and profits were used for their environmental protection goals. A 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization was also set up to transfer the nonvoting stock into. The nonprofit will be funded by Patagonia’s dividends, amounting to an estimated $100 million a year, for environmental protection efforts. The business interests were not donated to a charity, so they will encounter an estimated $17.5 million in gift tax, and no charitable deduction will be available to Chouinard. However, he effectively avoided $700 million in capital gains taxes and substantial estate tax liability upon his death.

Why Transfer Your Business Interests to a Purpose Trust?

A purpose trust can be a viable option for business succession planning if you own a profitable company and want to keep its mission alive. Similar to the Chouinard family, you can ensure that your company's values and mission continue to be upheld for many years to come, and that your employees have job security. This is particularly useful if you do not have children who are interested in running the business or if your children do not share your values. The terms of a purpose trust can ensure that future management adheres to the trust's purpose, and also ensures that the company remains private and that values remain a priority over profit.

From a business standpoint, what are your goals for the future? If you're interested in using your wealth for the benefit of a cause you’re passionate about, you might want to look into a purpose trust. Contact the team at Anderson, Dorn & Rader to see if this planning option is suitable for you.

One of the most crucial decisions within your life plan is determining who will manage the estate when you aren’t around anymore, or are no longer fit to do so. This individual is called the successor trustee.

A large amount of responsibility comes with being nominated as a successor trustee. Because of the complicated procedures, time they’ll need to dedicate, and risks that the trustee will assume, many people consider hiring a professional fiduciary (like an estate planner) to be their trustee.

When hiring a professional to carry out the duties of trustee, you’ll first need to ensure that a terms of engagement document is signed by both parties to lay out the relationship between parties. This should be a separate document from the one that identified their duties as your estate planner. You’ll also want to look for the following qualifications (and potential red flags) when deciding whether to carry out the relationship.

Senior couple planning their investments with financial advisor

Are Their Resources Adequate?

Even if a professional fiduciary is able to draft a thorough terms of engagement document, that doesn’t necessarily mean that they have all the resources to properly administer your trust. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You need to make sure that the professional fiduciary takes the trustee role seriously, and that they are well-equipped to take on the job. The below functions should be well within the wheelhouse of a satisfactory candidate for a professional trustee:

Accessibility

Even seasoned estate planners who take on the responsibility of trustee can find it difficult to fit your estate management into their schedule. The professional that you hire should be responsive and accessible. This is especially the case when the trust requires critical decisions related to distributions, beneficiary health, maintenance, education, and support. After you are gone, your beneficiaries will also be in constant contact with your hired fiduciary, and even more so when distributions are made on a reoccurring basis.

For instance, one of your beneficiaries may request an early distribution to cover the expenses of a medical procedure. Or perhaps the period to take advantage of government benefits is drawing to a close on a distribution amount. Will your professional trustee pick up the phone or quickly respond to an email in these instances? Proper communication is paramount to deal with the intricacies of your family’s lives, and your hired trustee must be passionate about providing them service when needed.

What is the Trustee’s Succession Plan?

No one can work forever, and even your hired trustee must retire at some point. Do they have a plan in place to transfer their responsibilities to another individual or firm? The terms in your trust should outline who will become your successor trustee, but in the case that your trust puts the power of designating the successor in the hands of the trustee, you’ll want to ask your professional fiduciary who will fill their place if something happens to them.

Will the Nominated Fiduciary Work Alongside Your Beneficiaries’ Advocates?

Some instances will require your professional trustee to communicate with the caregivers of your beneficiaries. This could be due to the beneficiaries being minors, or perhaps because they are disabled.

In the case that a beneficiary is not able to manage the assets they’re gifted in the trust, it’s vital that your professional trustee can communicate with caregivers to understand their needs and translate them into actionable estate management duties.

Northern Nevada Trust Attorneys

After applying these suggestions when considering a third party trustee, notify them of your decision to nominate them. Even though they won’t assume trustee duties until you are unfit or no longer around, being proactive benefits the planning of your affairs.

Your nominated professional trustee does not necessarily have to accept the position. But by finding out if they’d like to take on the responsibilities sooner than later, you’ll have ample time to make an educated decision if you need to select another individual.

If you have any questions about selecting a professional estate planner to be your trustee, the knowledgeable attorneys at Anderson, Dorn & Rader can help. We offer Trustee Services to help guide you in the process of choosing an adequate trustee to carry out your wishes and preserve your family’s wealth.

Schedule a FREE consultation to discover the benefits of choosing Anderson, Dorn & Rader as your professional corporate trustee. We look forward to serving your needs with a high level of professionalism, experience, and dignity to match the values of your family.

Life is riddled with unknowns. While you can control certain events like whether you’ll have kids or tie the knot, other milestones are not as easy to predict. Life comes at your fast, and sudden, unexpected events can muddle with estate planning. For this reason, make sure your plan is flexible.

Family and friends dining at home celebrating the holidays with traditional food and decoration, women talking together happy and casual

You’re able (and it’s recommended) to update your estate plan as you age. But when you die, the plan is more or less set in stone. To curb some of the unknowns that will inevitably arise, it’s a good idea to incorporate milestones into your estate plan. Milestones trigger predetermined decisions that allow you to exercise your wishes and pass wealth to loved ones after you are gone.

If-Then Statements: The Key To Carrying Out Your Wishes

If-then statements are pre-made decisions that are carried out based on conditions you set. They are commonly seen in legal documentation, including estate plans.

The concept of if-then statements is straightforward. If a certain criteria is met, then a given action is put into motion. Take the following for example: “If my spouse and I both pass away before our children are fit to care for themselves, [Relative X] will be nominated as their rightful guardian."

Clauses like these can reserve some of the power you have over otherwise unforeseen circumstances. They also offer more flexibility than more simplistic declarative statements (“I leave the property in The Hamptons to my oldest daughter”, for example).

If-then statements can build upon one another to account for various future scenarios. So you could say, “If my spouse and I both pass away before our children are fit to care for themselves, [Relative X] will be nominated as their rightful guardian. If [Relative X] is unfit to care for our children, [Friend A] will assume the nomination.”

Common Milestones to Include In Your Estate Plan

The beauty of conditional actions in your estate plan is that they can take on many forms. Aside from if-then statements, you can also include asset allocations or gifts that are put into motion when certain milestones are reached.

Check out these events that are commonly incorporated to trigger gifts or distributions to loved ones:

These milestones are just the tip of the iceberg, and can be combined or modified. For instance, you may give wedding money to a child while storing the rest of their inheritance within a trust. This ensures that if they get divorced, the assets you pass on won’t fall into the hands of their ex-spouse.

You can also set up your estate plan to allocate more money to an individual if the value of that asset increases over time. Remember that if-then statements can be used to make such allocations flexible. The possibilities are endless.

Secure Your Future with Reno Estate Planners

It's a complicated process to populate your estate plan with if-then statements and other milestones. But the work you do up front will protect you and your loved ones from the unknowns of the future.

The professional estate planners at Anderson, Dorn & Rader will help to put all your wishes in writing. To simplify the proceedings, we can spell out your conditional statements with flow charts and diagrams. These can then be integrated into your estate plan to provide clarity after you’re gone.

Whether you’re looking to update an existing life plan, or start from scratch, our estate planning lawyers can help. Contact Anderson, Dorn & Rader to secure your plans for the future and continue your legacy after you’re gone.

If you are the executor (personal representative) of a will, or the designated trustee of their trust passes away, it’s your legal duty to act in the best interests and distribute the assets to the beneficiaries of the trust according to the terms laid out by the benefactor.

*The roles of executor and trustee can be listed under the umbrella term: fiduciary, so we’ll refer to both as such throughout the blog. There are various reasons why you, the fiduciary may not be able to locate a beneficiary of the will or trust. Maybe you lost touch, or perhaps you had a falling out. What should you do in this situation?

When you were bestowed with a fiduciary role, it became your legal obligation to use reasonable diligence in attempting to locate the missing beneficiary. The definition of “reasonable” can depend on individual scenarios like the monetary value of the assets, and what actions have been made in attempting to contact the missing beneficiary.

Unresponsive beneficiary

To start, you as the fiduciary should call the missing beneficiary’s last known phone number, then send a notice that the estate / trust is being administered to their latest address on file. If you get no response from these initial touch points, try contacting their family members and friends for any information they may have on their whereabouts. Social media can also be a powerful tool, as well as people-locating sites on the internet. It also can’t hurt to conduct a property search via government websites, which often show official home records like deeds.

If the assets being distributed are not monetarily significant, you as the fiduciary won’t be required to shell out copious amounts of the trust’s money to try and locate the missing beneficiary. On the other hand, if the assets are of a significant amount, you may have to take further actions to attempt to locate the absent beneficiary to meet the threshold for ‘reasonable diligence’. These can include hiring a P.I. (private investigator) or utilizing an heir search specialist.

Hiring an Heir Search Specialist

Believe it or not, there’s are services dedicated to finding missing beneficiaries. By utilizing estate investigators and genealogists, heir search specialists are able to comb through vast swathes of the country – and worldwide – to find potential heirs. They do so thanks to access to records like birth, death, marriage, and adoption records.

Heir search specialists do cost money, but can provide peace of mind that the person receiving distributions from the trust is, in fact, who they say they are. Unfortunately, there are instances where people pretend to be estranged heirs, so it’s important to confirm identities before any money from the trust is handed over.

If your efforts in hiring a search specialist still don’t turn up the beneficiary you’re looking for, it’s possible to petition the court asking permission to distribute a preliminary amount of property and money to the beneficiaries who have been successfully located. It’s likely that the court will order that the assets be held in the trust for a period of time (this varies by state) so the missing beneficiary has a reasonable amount of time to come forth and claim it. Another option is to obtain indemnity insurance, which covers you in the scenario where a previously un-located beneficiary appears and asks for their portion of the trust after it’s been distributed.

Work with Trusted Reno Wealth Planning Attorneys

Tracking down an estranged beneficiary can take significant resources and lead to a prolonged asset distribution process. Additionally, the beneficiaries already located can often become impatient while time lapses. For these matters, it can benefit you to hire a legal professional with experience handling the known beneficiaries’ demands while still abiding by state regulations and protecting the trust’s best interests.

In the event where a beneficiary cannot be located, even after your due diligence efforts, it’s best to have a legal professional’s guidance when petitioning the court for a preliminary asset distribution to known beneficiaries. It saves time, and ensures legal compliance.

Becoming a fiduciary of a will or trust is an honor that comes with large responsibilities including carrying out the wishes of the deceased. Thankfully, you do not have to navigate challenging situations alone. By leaning on the extensive experience of the attorneys at Anderson, Dorn & Rader, your unique circumstances can be handled to provide a positive outcome for all parties involved. When you need estate administration assistance, our team will be ready. Contact Anderson, Dorn & Rader, and we’ll ensure your role as the fiduciary is maximized while honoring loved ones in the process.

In general, the answer is yes; your trust can own your business after you die. But taking a deeper look into this matter, some factors may affect your individual situation. Both the type of business you own (LLC, Partnership, corporation, sole proprietorship), as well as how your business is currently managed can determine how the trust obtains ownership and continues operations after you pass. We’ll explore these determining factors here:

Transfer Business Ownership

How Does the Trust Obtain Ownership of Your Business?

How Will the Business Managed After You Pass?

Once the trust has obtained ownership of your business, there are factors that affect how it will be managed after you are gone. The first factor is the type of business that has been transferred (which we explored above). The other is the way the business was managed prior to the transfer of ownership.

Transfer Business Ownership to Trust

What Do the Beneficiaries Receive?

As is the theme with trust transfers, the terms will determine whether income is distributed to beneficiaries. The trust is entitled to receive income or distribute profit distributions to owners or stockholders. 

Special Circumstances: 'S' Corporations

In the case that your business is taxed as an S corporation, there are unique circumstances under which someone can own the S corporation after your death. Prior to transferring ownershipof trust assets, consult a qualified attorney or financial professional. 

As discussed, there are many factors to consider and navigate when transferring business ownership before you die. Overall, it depends heavily on the type of business you are operating, as well as how it is currently being managed. Therefore, it’s a great idea to consult with professionals to properly consider every factor and complete the transfer of ownership with confidence. It can be daunting, but Anderson, Dorn & Rader is here to help!

Contact Anderson, Dorn & Rader, the trusted team of Nevada Wealth Counselors, to properly transfer ownership of your business before you pass.

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