In March 2004, the Senate passed Resolution 316, which officially recognized April as National Financial Literacy Month. Both Houses of Congress have passed similar resolutions since then designed to encourage financial literacy so that individuals are better prepared to manage their money, credit, and debt. Nevertheless, in the fourth quarter of 2019, U.S. household debt, which includes student debt, credit card debt, auto debt, mortgages, home equity loans, and other debts, exceeded $14 trillion for the first time ever.1 In addition, forty percent of the respondents of one recent survey indicated that it would be very difficult for them to meet their current financial obligations if their next paycheck were delayed for one week, and another thirty-four percent said it would be somewhat difficult.2 The COVID-19 pandemic has, unfortunately, made this potential difficulty a scary reality for many Americans.

Whether or not you are indeed struggling financially, it is important to do a realistic assessment of your financial situation and how prepared you and your family are for the future. Creating or updating your estate plan is an important part of exercising control over your finances, and ensuring that proper plans are in place can provide substantial peace of mind and security for you and your family.

Take an Inventory

One of the first steps in creating an estate plan is to take an inventory of your money and property. Regardless of whether you are wealthy or just getting by, everything that you own is part of your estate and should be listed--or at least accounted for-- in your inventory. This inventory should include the following:

As you and your estate planning attorney evaluate your inventory, there are several questions you should ask yourself.

Am I saving adequately for retirement? Clearly, the answer to this question will vary for different individuals and circumstances, but many financial advisors recommend saving ten to fifteen percent of your pre-tax income during the entire span of your entire working years. If you have not been saving adequately, consider increasing your contributions to your retirement accounts.

Are sufficient funds available to provide for my spouse and dependents if I pass away? If the answer is no, consider purchasing a life insurance policy large enough to replace your income, as well as pay off any outstanding debts, college for your children, final expenses, and other important expenses, e.g., the cost of your child’s wedding or their first car.

Do I have a lot of debt? If you have substantial debt, your family members generally will not be responsible for paying it if you pass away. However, your estate will have to pay off your creditors before your beneficiaries receive anything. Life insurance can help in this situation as well: You can either purchase life insurance sufficient to pay your debt or you can make family members or loved ones the beneficiaries of your policy (or a trust for their benefit), as the proceeds of the policy never become part of your estate but are transferred directly the beneficiaries of the policy. Similarly, retirement, investment, and brokerage accounts allow you to name one or more beneficiaries, keeping those funds outside of your estate. Real estate or accounts owned jointly will also pass directly to the surviving owner when permitted by state law.

An even better course of action, however, would be to meet with a financial planner who can help you create a budget enabling you to decrease or eliminate your debt so that your loved ones will receive all the money and property you would like them to have.

Protect Your Assets

If you transfer money and property you would like to preserve for your beneficiaries into an irrevocable trust, that is, a trust that cannot be amended, modified, or revoked (except under limited circumstances), those assets will be protected from any of your future creditors or judgments (with time limits). Because the money and property used to fund the trust is no longer yours and you have no control over it, it is not available to pay your creditors. Your family members and loved ones can be named as the beneficiaries of the trust. This strategy can be particularly helpful for individuals working in professions that are at a high risk of lawsuits, e.g., doctors, lawyers, etc.

Warning: An irrevocable trust will not protect money and property from creditors having a claim at the time the trust is created. Courts can rescind transfers to trusts if they are determined to have been made with the intention to defraud current creditors.

Consider the Needs of Your Beneficiaries

Protect their inheritance from their creditors. Even if you take all the steps necessary to ensure that your beneficiaries receive a nice nest egg when you pass away, it can disappear quickly once it is in their hands unless your estate plan is designed to avoid this possibility. Fortunately, you can create a trust with terms that will protect your beneficiaries’ inheritance against claims arising from their creditors, divorcing spouses, or lawsuits. There are a variety of different types of trusts that can protect the money and property from such claims, but the following are among the most commonly used. 

Create a trust for a specific purpose(s). You can include terms in your trust authorizing the trustee to make distributions for your children or other loved ones for specific purposes so that even after you have passed away, you are still able to help the trust beneficiaries make certain important purchases or pay for special care.  

Let Us Help You and Your Family Move Toward a Secure Future

Celebrate Financial Literacy Month by taking steps to get your financial house in order. Estate planning is an essential part of this process, as it is all about providing you and your family with the peace of mind that comes with knowing that even if the unexpected happens, the future is secure. Please call us today at (775) 823-9455 to set up a meeting so we can create an estate plan that meets all of your needs and goals.

1 Federal Reserve Bank of New York, “Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit, February 2020,” accessed March 17, 2020, https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/interactives/householdcredit/data/pdf/hhdc_2019q4.pdf

2 American Payroll Association, “Getting Paid in America Survey,” last modified September 10, 2019, https://www.nationalpayrollweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2019GettingPaidInAmericaSurveyResults.pdf

H. L. Mencken once said, "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple and wrong." In our quest for a simple solution to avoid probate, you may hear someone make a suggestion that makes some sense on the surface. But when it comes to estate planning you have to ask yourself why informed people don't take this layperson's advice.
There are those who like to think that the powers that be make things more difficult than they need to be, and perhaps there are cases when this is actually true. However, don't buy into overly simplistic assumptions regarding the transfer of assets to your loved ones after you pass away.
One idea that circulates is the notion that you can simply add someone's name to your bank accounts and tell this individual how you want your resources divided among your heirs after you pass away.
We will just assume for a minute that there is absolutely no chance that this individual that you choose will decide to do anything with the resources of which you would not approve either while you are living or after you pass away. (But of course in reality anything is possible.)
What if this perfectly trustworthy individual was to get into financial trouble or become the target of a lawsuit? As a joint account holder the funds that are in the account are the property of this person and they are subject to attachment. If that person dies before carrying out your wishes, their estate plan (or the government's plan) will determine where your assets will go.
Elder financial abuse has become a big problem in the United States today. Senior citizens are scammed out of billions of dollars annually. What if your co-account holder was to become a victim of financial abuse? You could wake up one morning and find the cupboard bare and there would little you could do about it.
Don't take chances with your financial assets. Perhaps it is time to engage the services of a licensed estate planning attorney who will assist you as you arrange for future asset transfers in a safe and effective manner.

It can be quite an exciting and challenging adventure to go into business for yourself.  As we all know the majority of start-ups do not succeed in the long run so you have to defy the odds to gain traction and become successful.
Because of the demands involved in starting up a business how you will be exit the business may not be the first thing on your mind.  However, once you know that you are in fact going to be in it for the long haul you should ask yourself how you or your estate will proceed when it is time to retire or after you pass away.
The way you approach this is going to vary depending on the type of business you are in. Some businesses are owner driven, such as professional practices and they are not really viable after the exit of the owner.  Other businesses will continue to operate after the owner steps away. Some plan on handing the business off to the next generation. Others intend to sell the business to finance their retirement years.  Partners in small businesses have yet a different set of circumstances to address.
The best way to explore your options and ultimately devise an exit strategy is to sit down with an experienced Reno NV estate planning attorney.  Your lawyer will gain an understanding of your unique situation, listen as you explain your objectives, and give you the appropriate advice.

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